Here’s Why You Should Stop Taking Fish Oil

For years, nutrition experts have told you to take fish oil. It’s good for your heart… it may boost memory and mental clarity… and it’s a potent anti-inflammatory.

So why would I suggest you stop taking fish oil?

Because the latest research shows it’s not the best way to get your Omega-3s. If you’re still taking fish oil, you may be missing out on important benefits.

Fish Oil Delivers the Wrong Balance of Omega-3s

Read the label of almost any fish oil, and you’ll notice something. Fish oils have far more EPA than DHA. These two “marine” Omega-3s deliver most of fish oil’s benefits. But they’re not created equal.

For example, it’s the DHA in fish oil that’s key to healthy vision. You also have high levels of DHA in your brain. There, it’s critical for sending nerve signals efficiently.

Among its other jobs, DHA boosts immune function, fights inflammation, and improves the metabolism of individual cells.

DHA is a vital part of cell membranes. It blocks large LDL molecules from the muscle cells lining your arteries. So DHA supports normal flow in your arteries.

That’s not to say EPA isn’t useful. For example, it’s the main anti-inflammatory Omega-3. EPA also helps ease joint pain. It works by blocking the action of enzymes that trigger inflammation – such as the so-called “COX” enzymes.

With all DHA does, getting more may be a key to staying as healthy as possible.

Especially since most Americans don’t get enough.

Omega-3s May Be the Chink in Your Health Armor

A study funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) found people with higher levels of EPA and DHA in their blood have a lower risk of early death.

A second study found most people – in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East – don’t get enough Omega-3s. The Japanese and Scandinavians came out on top… probably because they eat a lot of fatty fish.

To get Americans up to the highest levels seen in the NHLBI study would require up to a gram of extra Omega-3s a day.

Only a handful of fish – such as mackerel, herring, and salmon – have that much in a single serving. And you’d have to eat a serving a day, while the guideline is only two servings a week.

Even then, you’d be getting far more EPA than DHA. Just as you would with most supplements. That’s where Omega Rejuvenol comes in.

A Better Way to Get Your Omega-3s… and More

Developed by nutrition pioneer Dr. Al Sears, Omega Rejuvenol replaces fish oil with two other marine Omega-3s: krill and calamari oils.

The calamari oil in Omega Rejuvenol is 50% DHA – the highest concentration I’ve ever seen. And krill, being at the bottom of the food chain, are as clean a source of Omega-3s as you’ll find.

Omega Rejuvenol also delivers key vitamins often low in our diet: Vitamins A, D3, and K2. Plus, it’s a good source of tocotrienols – forms of vitamin E very scarce in the Western diet.

Finally, Dr. Sears added the potent antioxidant astaxanthin. Studies suggest it may help normalize the balance between “good” and “bad” cholesterol… defend against narrowing of arteries… and even promote blood sugar control.

If you’re still taking fish oil, your supplement is out of date. Click here to read more about the power-boosting support of DHA-rich marine oils – and more – with Omega Rejuvenol

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Calder, P.C., “The DHA content of a cell membrane can have a significant influence on cellular

behaviour and responsiveness to signals,” Ann Nutr Metab. 2016; 69(suppl 1): 8–21.

Sears, B., “What Are The Real Differences Between EPA and DHA?” Psychology Today. Apr 1, 2012.

“Study finds link between high EPA and DHA omega-3 blood levels and decreased risk of death,” Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3s. Feb 21, 2017.

Kishimoto, Y., et al, “Potential Anti-Atherosclerotic Properties of Astaxanthin,” Mar Drugs. Feb 5, 2016; 14(2). pii: E35.


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Posted in Brain, Heart, Herbs

Does New Study Really Show a Low-Carb Diet Is Deadly?

The headline says it all: “Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be
avoided.”

According to new research from Poland, following a low-carb diet raises your risk of cancer, heart disease, and stroke. Plus, a low-carb lifestyle boosts your risk of an early death by almost a third!

Really? Or is this another case of medical fear-mongering?

Before you start adding mounds of pasta back into your diet, here’s what you need to know.

It Looks Like Someone’s Jumping to Conclusions

Just because two things exist side by side, it’s not proof one causes the other. Scientists put it this way: “Correlation is not causation.”

It’s easy to jump to conclusions when two things seem to pop up together consistently. For example, look at my recent message on osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease.

Studies show that people with osteoporosis are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s. But the best research suggests it’s not because osteoporosis leads to Alzheimer’s. It’s more likely they have common risk factors.

This new study only found that low-carb diets and a higher risk of certain health issues exist side by side. It doesn’t prove the one causes the other.

In fact, the results of this study are way out of line with what its own authors found in other studies.

Violating the Cardinal Rule of Proof

The Polish study’s authors reviewed seven similar studies. And the numbers they found weren’t even close to theirs.

The risk of early death in the other studies was half their finding. The heart disease risk in the other studies was less than a third. And the cancer risk was below 25% of their number.

In other words, seven other studies found a correlation… but it was just a fraction of the new study’s results.

Another number that didn’t match up? Follow-up. The other seven studies average follow-up was 15.6 years. The new study had an average follow-up of just 6.4 years. Getting such highly inflated results in such a short time should set off alarm bells.

The press release for this new study may contain its own explanation for the alarming results.

Not All Low-Carb Diets Are Healthy

General dietary descriptions can be misleading. For instance, years ago, I worked with a young vegetarian lady. She knew vegetarians lived longer than average, and was convinced she should avoid meat.

But her “vegetarian” diet consisted largely of fast-food burgers (without the beef patty) with French fries… meatless pizza… and other questionable food choices. Technically, she was a vegetarian, but her diet was anything but healthy.

A low-carb diet can be the same. If you replace complex carbs with red meat and saturated fat, you’re not doing yourself any favors. Even though you’re technically following a low-carb diet.

And the new study’s authors seem to admit this when they point out, “The reduced intake of fiber and fruits and increased intake of animal protein, cholesterol, and saturated fat with these diets may play a role. Differences in minerals, vitamins and phytochemicals might also be involved.”

In other words, replacing complex carbs – like flour, pasta, and potatoes – with red meat and saturated fat may not be your best choice.

A healthy low-carb diet is low in complex carbs… but rich in fruits and vegetables. It appears the Polish study is really pointing out that eating an unhealthy diet may be linked to poor health.

A 2018 study published by The Lancet came to exactly that conclusion. In this study, people who substituted red meat and fat for carbs had a higher risk of early death. But those who swapped out complex carbs for fruits and veggies lowered their risk.

There Is Such a Thing as a Healthy Low-Carb Lifestyle

A 2014 study in the Annals of Internal Medicine compared a low-fat diet to a low-carb diet. After a year, volunteers on the low-carb diet had lost 7.7 pounds more than the low-fat group. The low-carb group also saw a bigger drop in blood fats linked to heart disease.

In 2015, an international team of doctors recommended a low-carb diet to help control Type II diabetes.

The doctors (more than two dozen of them!) pointed out a low-carb diet beats low-fat for controlling blood sugar, weight loss, and more. In fact, the group found twelve points in favor of a low-carb diet.

And a 20-year-long study from Harvard School of Public Health found no link between low-carb diets and higher heart disease risk. But the study did find replacing complex carbs with plant foods lowered the risk of heart disease.

Should You Go Low-Fat? The Bottom Line

Complex carbohydrates are not your friends. A moderate amount of whole grains isn’t bad. But most products today are “made with whole grains” – or “contain whole grains.” Which means you’re really getting mostly processed carbs.

And processed carbs lead to blood sugar spikes… which can lead to diabetes.

High-carb diets are also linked to obesity, which can cause a whole laundry list of health problems. Like heart disease, arthritis, and stroke.

A low-carb lifestyle beats low-fat hands down in battling obesity, maintaining lean muscle mass, easing blood fat issues, defeating diabetes, and more. Just be smart about it.

Replace complex carbs with veggies – especially dark and brightly colored options. Red peppers are loaded with fiber and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables deliver lutein, vitamin K, and essential minerals. Broccoli is a rich source of sulforaphanes – plant compounds that battle cancer.

Skinless, free-range poultry… grass-fed beef… and wild-caught fish are great sources of protein – along with other nutrients missing from their factory-farmed counterparts.

And, of course, eat a moderate amount of fruits and nuts.

Can a low-carb diet cause an early death? If you replace the carbs with factory-farmed bacon and saturated fats, probably. But if you eat a diet rich in gunpowder, you chance the same effect.

Any time you add too much of a good thing, you risk hurting your health.

You need protein. You need fats. Even saturated fats. But you don’t need too much of them.

A low-carb lifestyle that includes plenty of fruits and veggies – only a moderate amount of protein and dietary fats – isn’t likely to boost your risk of an early death. In fact, as the folks at Harvard found, it may do just the opposite.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


“Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided,” European Society of Cardiology. Aug 28, 2018.

Seidelmann, S.B., et al, “Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis,” The Lancet Public Health. Published Online Aug 16, 2018.

“Comparing Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets,” Ann Intern Med. 2014; 161(5): I-22.

Feinman, R.D., et al, “Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence base,” Nutrition. 2015; 13: 1–13.

“20-year Study Finds No Association Between Low-carb Diets And Risk Of Coronary Heart Disease,” Science Daily. Nov 9, 2006.


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Posted in Diet

Even Worse Than Your Worst Health Nightmare

We fear a handful of diseases more than others. And rightfully so.

Diseases like osteoporosis. Many sufferers – especially women – don’t realize they have it until they begin to shrink… or develop the so-called “widow’s hump.”

Osteoporosis leaves you fragile. Like a delicate porcelain doll, even a slight bump or misstep can leave you broken… shattered. Fear of fractures has sidelined millions of formerly active adults.

Osteoporosis – weak, brittle bones – rates as a top fear among mature adults. For active seniors, it’s a nightmare.

Dementia – the slipping away of your mind, memory, and identity – is another nightmare that haunts us.

So imagine if the two were connected. If having osteoporosis also raised your risk of dementia.

Well, it does. Here’s what you need to know to build your defenses now.

Huge Study Links Osteoporosis and Dementia

A team of German and French doctors followed the health of almost 60,000 adults for 20 years. What they found was developing osteoporosis raises your risk of dementia up to about 30%.

The doctors compared 29,983 adults with osteoporosis to 29,983 healthy adults. After 20 years, they found men with osteoporosis were 20% more likely to develop dementia. Among women, the risk rose by 30%.

This wasn’t the first study to reach this conclusion. In 2014, Chinese researchers published a similar study. This research showed a 46% higher risk of any dementia among patients with osteoporosis. And a 39% higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

A 2017 European analysis of studies also found a link, but the authors took their research a step further. And that may be the good news here.

There’s No Proof Osteoporosis Leads to Dementia

The European team combed through 66 years of studies. They discovered scientists saw a link between osteoporosis and dementia… but no evidence the one causes the other.

But they did find evidence of similar risk factors for both diseases.

In other words, the two share some risk factors. Which may be why people with osteoporosis are more likely to develop dementia. It also means, working to prevent or reverse osteoporosis may also cut your risk of dementia.

Here’s what the scientists found…

You Can Control Risk Factors for Both Diseases

The two diseases have several common risk factors. The study only mentions one you can’t control, so let’s talk about that one first.

You have a gene called APOE. It carries the “plans” for a protein called apolipoprotein E. This protein links with fats to help carry cholesterol in your bloodstream.

APOE has several variants. One of these – APOE4 – is linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). People with the APOE4 variety of the gene are more likely to develop AD.

As it turns out, they’re also at a higher risk of osteoporosis.

The good news is that about half of all people have a different form of the APOE gene – called APOE3. Others have the APOE2 variant. So the chances are good you don’t have this risk factor anyway.

The scientists also found nutritional issues linked to higher risk for both dementia and osteoporosis. Two are especially easy to influence.

People with both these diseases tend to have lower levels of vitamins D and K than healthy adults. So, in theory, boosting your intake of these two vitamins should cut your risk.

To boost your vitamin K levels, eat more leafy green vegetables – such as spinach, chard, and kale. You can get smaller amounts from cabbage, broccoli, fish, meat and eggs.

Your best source of vitamin D is sunlight. Just 20 minutes of summer sun a day will trigger more than enough vitamin D for a person with “average” white skin. If your skin is darker, it will take longer. (Never stay in the sun long enough to burn!)

You can also get some vitamin D from fatty fish, beef liver, and vitamin-fortified foods. Or take a natural vitamin D supplement.

Both these vitamins help build bone mass. Higher levels are linked to a lower risk of dementia. And they may be an easy way to avoid your worst health nightmare.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Kostev, K., et al, “Impact of Osteoporosis on the Risk of Dementia in Almost 60,000 Patients Followed in General Practices in Germany,” Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Jul 21, 2018.

Chang, K.H., et al, “Increased risk of dementia in patients with osteoporosis: a population- based retrospective cohort analysis,” Age. Apr 2014; 36(2): 967-975.

Downey, C.L., et al, “Dementia and osteoporosis in a geriatric population: Is there a common link?” World J Orthop. May 18, 2017; 8(5): 412–423.


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3 Secrets to a Longer, More Active Life

In terms of longevity, the world saw two milestones in July 2018. Chiyo Miyako, the world’s oldest woman passed away at 117. And the world’s oldest man, Masazo Nonaka, celebrated his 113th birthday.

As you may have guessed by the names, both these “super-centenarians” are Japanese. Japan has more people over 100 than any other country. Last year, Japan boasted 67,824 people over 100.

Japan doesn’t just have the highest percentage of citizens over 100, either. The country enjoys the longest average life expectancy of any major industrialized nation.

Perhaps even more important, Japanese citizens generally enjoy 75 years or more of robust good health. Japanese seniors are healthier and more active on average than their peers anywhere in the world.

And science is beginning to unravel their secrets.

Okinawa – Japan’s Anti-aging “Blue Zone”

Perhaps you’ve heard of Blue Zones before. They’re spots where people tend to live much longer than average. Okinawa – a string of Japanese islands – has long held a place of honor among blue zones. Because Okinawans held the record for long, healthy lives for many, many years.

Okinawans have a mealtime tradition somewhat different from other cultures. Before each meal, Okinawans traditionally said, “Hara hachi bu.” It’s a reminder to eat only till you’re 80% full.

Calorie restriction is linked to longevity in some animal studies. So scientists believe the tradition of not eating till your full may contribute to the long life Okinawans have enjoyed for centuries.

The traditional Okinawan diet is also different from most other parts of the world.

Okinawans eat fish about 3 times a week. They rarely eat red meat. And their local vegetables are remarkably nutrient-dense.

According to Britain’s Guardian newspaper, “their purple sweet potatoes are rich in flavonoids, carotenoids, vitamin E and lycopene…” They also eat bitter melons and bitter cucumbers that are nutrient dense. Their diet includes lots of green tea and the spice turmeric. And at least two types of seaweed are a regular part of their diet.

But scientists have seen a change in the health status of younger Okinawans. Since the arrival of U.S. troops – and the fast food outlets that come in their wake – the life expectancy of Okinawans has begun to drop. Western foods may be erasing one of the world’s Blue Zones.

But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t follow Japan’s example.

This “Health Backwater” May Prove to Be the World’s Newest Blue Zone

Nagano Prefecture sits at the heart of the Japanese Alps. And at the heart of Japan.

Nagano is best known as the home to the 1998 Winter Olympics. But, in Japan, Nagano was also known for many years as the home of some of Japan’s shortest-lived citizens. If you lived in Nagano, your chances of a long life were pretty slim.

Then all that changed.

You see, Nagano is land-locked. Mountainous. And offers very little land suitable for farming. Men here had fairly high rates of stroke, heart disease, and other health problems.

Throughout the winter, Nagano’s residents ate lots of pickled vegetables – which are extremely high in salt. In fact studies showed people in Nagano ate 2 to 3 times the “safe” amount of salt in their diets.

So the government stepped in to change the local diet. And more.

Today, men in Nagano work well past the U.S. retirement age. And when they “retire,” many work on family farms – remaining active well into their 70s and 80s.

The people of Nagano eat far less salt then before… and focus their diet on healthier options. The result is a huge boost in life expectancy.

Women in Nagano now live an average of 87.2 years. Men average 80.9 years. And most of those years are healthy years. The turn-around has been so dramatic, the average life expectancy in Nagano is greater than in Okinawa.

AARP showcased an example of this dramatic turnaround in 2014.

When Takami Kuroiwa retired, he began working on the family farm. But, by the time he was 66, Kuroiwa had rejoined the workforce, and began working in the tourism industry.

But he still devoted 12 hours a day on weekends to the family farm. “It’s part of the lifestyle here, says Kuroiwa.” You work in an office and then you retire to the farm. It’s just the next stage in life.”

The combination of diet and activity seems to work. As I said, Nagano now outpaces Okinawa in terms of longevity.

But one Japanese researcher hopes to answer the longevity question once and for all.

Decades of Data Reveal Keys to Longevity

Professor Manami Inoue has been following the health of more than 100,000 Japanese adults since the 1990s.

Prof. Inoue’s volunteers were between 40 and 69 at the start of the study. And they’ve been checking in every 5 to 10 years since.

So far, the study has found – among other things…

  • Smoking boosts your risk of early death by 50%.
  • Drinking green tea lowers your risk of all-cause mortality.
  • Lifestyle is far more important than genetics when it comes to longevity.

Needless to say, the lifestyle discovery is the most significant. Because it shows you can make a big impact on how long you’ll live.

As younger Okinawans embrace Western habits, their life expectancy drops. But the people of Nagano have made the opposite change. Proving you can turn a dark future into a bright one… just by making a few simple changes in your life.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


“World’s oldest person Chiyo Miyako dies at 117 in Japan,” CBS News. Jul 27, 2018.

Mellen, R., “The world’s oldest man just turned 113. His secret? Eating candy,” The Washington Post. Jul 25, 2018.

Booth, M., “The Okinawa diet – could it help you live to 100?” The Guardian. Jun 19, 2013.

Spitzer, K., “Secrets From the Longest-Living Place on Earth,” AARP Bulletin. May 2014.

Dumé, B. “Unlocking The Secrets of Longevity in Japan,” Scientific American. Jul 12, 2016.


© Copyright 2018 Discovery Health Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Posted in Diet

Even “Trusted Sources” May Put Your Health at Risk

The lie reared its ugly head again. As the U.S. celebrated National Tequila Day, “news” outlets fell all over themselves to remind us that drinking tequila may be a great way to lose weight.

Seriously. Britain’s Independent ran with the headline, “TEQUILA IS LINKED TO WEIGHT LOSS, STUDY CLAIMS.”

According to the article, “…a study has found a link between tequila and weight loss.” And, “According to research… everyone’s favorite party spirit, which is being celebrated today in the US for National Tequila Day, can help lower your blood sugar too.”

The only problem? It’s complete B.S.

Millions rely on the Web for health information. Here’s why that’s often a bad – even potentially fatal – idea.

Numbers Have Become More Important Than Truth

Newscaster Walter Cronkite was once the most trusted man in America. When he closed his nightly newscast with “And that’s the way it is,” millions of Americans knew it was true.

In those days, networks took news coverage seriously. The nightly news – both national and local – wasn’t expected to turn a profit. It was expected to inform. It was the cost for filling the rest of their airtime with programming aimed at making a buck.

At some point, this view began to change. The network with the most news viewers started prime time with an advantage. Getting up to change the channel was a hassle. So the biggest news audience could boost prime time ratings. And profits.

Human interest stories began to crowd out actual news stories. Journalists were replaced at the anchor desk with pretty faces. And sensationalism took the place of accuracy in headlines.

Which brings us to the tequila story.

We Got You to Read It… Who Cares If It’s Not True?

Apparently, not some major media outlets. Here are the headlines they ran on the same study The Independent covered…

Time Magazine – “Study: Sugars Found In Tequila Could Help You Lose Weight”
Cosmopolitan – “It turns out tequila is GOOD FOR YOU”
Britain’s Daily Express – “Weight loss: How THIS alcoholic drink could help you lose weight”

All of these stories – and dozens of others I checked – claim drinking tequila may help you lose weight. All cited the same 2014 study.

It wasn’t till I reached page 3 of the 8.6 million results for “tequila weight loss” that I found a dissenting voice.

That’s disturbing. Because drinking tequila won’t help you lose weight. And the study all these stories cite tells you exactly that.

The study found agavins – a carbohydrate in agave plants – helped keep blood sugar levels lower in mice. They also boosted insulin levels in these mice.

That may be good news for diabetics. But not for tequila drinkers. Why?

 “All ethanol in tequila comes from the fermentation of glucose and fructose generated after agave pines are cooked,” says a press release from the publisher. “But because the agavins are converted to ethanol, agavins are not found in the finished product.”

This is the source material for most of these articles. But hundreds of media outlets went for the sensational headline… and skipped the truth.

An isolated incident? I don’t think so. The Independent also published this headline: “DRINKING TEQUILA IS GOOD FOR YOUR BONES, SCIENCE SAYS.”

Which is also complete B.S. But that didn’t stop other media outlets – such as The N.Y. Post and L.A. Times from publishing the same misleading crap.

There’s only one way to protect yourself from this kind of bad reporting.

Get the Real Story From the Source

You’ll often get a different story reading the source material health reporters use. Sometimes an article includes a link to the source. If it doesn’t, you may have to dig a little.

If an article’s source is a university study, the college has probably issued a press release. Just search online for the topic and the university name. Or go to the university’s website and search there.

Organizations often publish research presented at conferences. They also issue press releases. A search for the organization and the topic will often turn up the source material.

If all else fails, PubMed (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) or Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.com) can often find the source material for you.

You can’t always trust media reports. As we’ve seen here, the drive for viewers can trump facts. And when it comes to your health, you need facts.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Hosie, R., “Tequila Is Linked to Weight Loss, Study Claims,” The Independent. Jul 26, 2018.

Sifferlin, A., “Study: Sugars Found In Tequila Could Help You Lose Weight,” Tiime. Mar 18, 2014.

Harvey-Jenner, C., “It turns out tequila is good for you,” Cosmopolitan. Jun 1, 2017.

“Weight loss: How this alcoholic drink could help you lose weight,” Express.co.uk.

“Tequila plant is possible sweetener for diabetics — helps reduce blood sugar, weight,” American Chemical Society. Mar 16, 2014.

Young, S., “Drinking Tequila Is Good For Your Bones, Science Says,” The Independent. Jul 24, 2018.

Downey, A., “Drinking tequila could boost bone health,” N.Y. Post. May 8, 2017.

Fantozzi, J., “Drinking Tequila Is Good for Your Bones,” The Daily Mail. May 10, 2017.

“In search of a treatment for osteoporosis from the tequila agave,” ScienceDaily.com. Apr 9, 2016.


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23andEverybody… Your Genetic Data May Screw You

The company calls itself “23andMe.” It’s a reference to the 23 pairs of chromosomes that express your unique genetic make-up.

More than 5 million people have sent their genetic material for analysis. 80% of them say the company can share their genetic data for research.

And share the company does. They’re selling your data to drug makers, research labs, and universities. In fact, it’s their big moneymaker.

Now, two new developments may change just how “private” your genetic privacy really is.

That’s why I’m sending out this urgent alert.

Big Pharma’s Big Play for Your Genetic Data

23andMe has a clear privacy policy. They promise not to share identifiable data without your okay.

That’s nice. But a new partnership may be the first step in eroding that policy.

Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline just invested $300 million in 23andMe. Which includes a 4-year data-sharing partnership.

This could be a problem. As Gizmodo noted in April of 2017, “Though to be fair, it’s debatable how anonymous that data really is.”

“In one case,” they report, “researchers were able to find out a man’s last name using only the short repeats on his Y chromosome and access to a genealogy database.”

In other words, if they want to find out who you are, they probably can.

That could be a problem. But another issue may be worse.

If insurance companies – or employers – can demand your DNA profile, you may wind up out of work… out of coverage… and out of luck.

That’s where Congress comes in.

Kiss Your Privacy – and Maybe Much More – Good-bye

Back in 2008,  Congress saw dangers in DNA testing.

  • Employers might not hire folks at a high genetic risk for some health issues.
  • Insurers might charge them higher rates. Or simply deny coverage

So Congress passed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). The Act blocks the use of your genetic information by employers and insurers.

You see, a “genetic predisposition” doesn’t prove anything. And Congress felt companies shouldn’t discriminate on the basis of genetic risk.

So they banned the practice before it could take hold. Now, those protections are under attack.

The “Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act” would exempt workplace wellness programs from the genetic testing ban. And employees who refuse genetic testing may even be fined.

Congress Is Rolling Back Your Privacy Rights

This new act creates three exemptions to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and GINA.

  • It rolls back protections under the ADA
  • It lets health insurers collect DNA data
  • It lets companies collect genetic information on employees’ family members.

That’s right: Congress may make your genetic information available to employers and insurance companies. And punish you if you don’t cooperate.

The “Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act” (H.R. 1313) has already passed its first committee. All Republicans voted in favor. All Democrats opposed the Act.

If this act passes Congress, employers will be free to demand DNA tests… and who knows where that could lead?

One thing, though, is clear. Big Pharma and the insurance industry both want your DNA data. And the only one who can lose in that scenario is you.

If you’re concerned about your genetic privacy, you need to make yourself heard. Contact your senator and congressperson and let them know you oppose H.R. 1313. You can find their contact info at https://www.congress.gov/contact-us.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Cookson, C. and Samson, A., “GSK invests $300m in gene profiling group 23andMe,” The Financial Times. Jul 25, 2018.

Brown, K.V., “23andMe Is Selling Your Data, But Not How You Think,” Gizmodo.com. Apr 14, 2017.

“Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act,” Wikipedia. Apr 3, 2018.

“H.R.1313 – Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act,” Congress.gov. Dec 11, 2017.

Brown K.V., “Why We Should All Be Worried About Congress Eroding Protections Against Genetic Discrimination,” Gizmodo.com. Mar 16, 2017.


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Are You a Victim of Unnecessary Surgery? It’s More Common than You Think

The old adage says, “To a man with a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail.” It’s an amusing observation… until you apply it to surgery.

The latest evidence suggests surgeons see the world very much like that man with the hammer. And the result has been millions of pointless surgeries.

The latest example reveals doctors perform over 200,000 pointless surgeries every year. For just one problem. And that’s in the U.S. alone. Worldwide, the number is much higher.

And that’s just one example. Before you submit to any surgery, here’s what you need to know…

The Shoulder Pain Cure That Isn’t

“Shoulder impingement syndrome” is a common problem. It’s often called “thrower’s shoulder” or “swimmer’s shoulder.” It’s caused by inflammation of the muscles and tendons of the rotator cuff.

The standard treatment is “keyhole” surgery. This is a minimally invasive surgery to “decompress” the inflammation.

In the U.S. alone, doctors do more than 210,000 of these procedures every year. And new research from Finland shows they’re pretty much pointless.

This isn’t the first study to show these procedures don’t work. Earlier studies found the procedure doesn’t work any better than “placebo surgery.” In spite of that, the number of these surgeries performed has skyrocketed.

Think about that for a moment: Multiple studies show this procedure doesn’t offer real relief. And doctors keep cutting anyway.

The Finnish study followed 189 patients for two years. Patients who had fake surgery got just as much relief as those who went through the real thing.

Basically, this suggests you could just cut a patient’s skin, stitch it up, and they’d get just as much benefit as if you’d sliced and diced inside their shoulder.

And here’s the awful part: In spite of multiple studies showing this procedure doesn’t work, doctors still perform it routinely.

In spite of the fact physiotherapy works as well.

But at far less cost. And at no profit to surgeons. An anomaly? Hardly.

Pointless Heart Surgeries Abound

The New York Times reports the use of stents may be no more than an example of the placebo effect.

“The placebo effect” is the change in health status caused by an inert change. For example, the use of a sugar pill. Or – as in the study above – faux surgery.

In a 2007 study, involving nearly 2,300 patients with narrowed arteries, installing stents provided no more benefit than non-surgical therapy. There was virtually no difference in the results.

After years of arguments – during which cardiologists defended the use of stents – another trial took place.

The results? Patients merely sedated for 15 minutes performed just as well as those who’d had stents implanted. Which backed up the results of several studies completed in the interim.

Including a 2012 review that compared 8 heart studies. In this study, stents offered no benefit beyond other therapies.

This study wasn’t an outlier, either.

Unnecessary Knee Surgery

A 2014 New York Times (NYT) article looked at treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.

The article said minimally invasive surgery was common at the turn of the century. But, in 2002, a study of 180 patients showed this approach is no more effective than placebo surgery.

In this study, some patients had an incision made to look like they’d had surgery. But this “sham” surgery was just as effective as the actual surgery.

That year, this pointless surgery generated $3 billion in revenue. And doctors continued to perform the procedure.

The NYT also reports the number of arthroscopic surgeries for meniscus (cartilage) tears grew as surgeries for knee OA began to drop.

Doctors performed 700,000 of these surgeries – worth $4 billion – in the U.S. in the mid-2000s. But by 2012, these surgeries were also shown to be no more effective than a placebo.

The NYT article also pointed to a 2014 review showing pointless surgeries were remarkably common. Of the 53 studies researchers reviewed, more than half revealed no benefit from the actual surgery.

When Surgery Is Involved, Let the Buyer Beware

Obviously, not all surgery is unnecessary. In fact, many surgeries save lives.

On the other hand, many surgeries appear to be more about making money than providing genuine relief.

And it’s those cases we should look at.  The Guardian notes studies that question knee surgeries… spine procedures… gallstone and angina procedures… and more.

“More and more, it’s looking like a lot of surgeries have no benefit,” says Ian Harris, a professor of surgery at the University of New South Wales. “And as long as we keep doing them anyway – risk to patients aside – it just means that we are wasting a hell of a lot of money, and that doesn’t even touch the surgeries that we haven’t studied yet.”

Your bottom line? Don’t accept the need for surgery just because a doctor says so. If your condition allows, get a second – or even third – opinion.

In many cases, you may find surgery is just a fancy way to separate you from your wallet.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Lehtinen, P., “Finnish study shows that most common shoulder operation is no more be no more beneficial than placebo surgery,” University of Helsinki. Jul 19, 2018.

Carroll, A.E., “Heart Stents Are Useless for Most Stable Patients. They’re Still Widely Used,” New York Times. Feb 12, 2018.

Carroll, A.E., “The Placebo Effect Doesn’t Apply Just to Pills,” New York Times. Oct 6, 2014.

Mohammadi, D., “When surgery is just a stitch-up,” The Guardian. Aug 20, 2017.


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Our Drug Delivery System Is Broken From Start to Finish

You don’t often hear the mainstream claiming the U.S. has the best healthcare system anymore. Because we don’t. By almost all measures, U.S. healthcare has fallen far behind the rest of the developed world.

In fact, we only lead the world in one area of healthcare: spending. And nowhere does the gap between spending and performance stand out more than in our “drug delivery system.”

In simple terms, the U.S. has a drug problem, and opioids play just a tiny part. Not only does this put you in danger… it’s draining your wallet.

Here’s what Big Pharma doesn’t want you to know.

The Drug Companies Have a Shoot First, Ask Questions Later Attitude

Millions of Americans take blood thinners. There’s evidence they may help prevent stroke or second heart attacks. Aspirin and warfarin are probably the two best known. But their patents expired decades ago. So everyone under the sun can make a generic version.

To keep profits up, drug companies are under constant pressure to come up with new drugs to patent. That’s where the real money is. Sometimes these new drugs are better than older ones, but often they’re not.

As long as they’re reasonably effective, Big Pharma will push the new drugs to improve their profits.

This pressure to perform leads to all sorts of problems. Like cherry-picking the studies used to submit a drug for approval. And failing to publish less favorable studies.

Drug companies seem to favor a “shoot first, ask questions later” attitude. Get the drug out in the market… and deal with any problems later. As long as the FDA will approve it, people will buy it.

As may be the case with two newer blood thinners.

FDA Approval Doesn’t Guarantee Effectiveness… or Safety

Back in late 2015, there was a news story that most folks overlooked. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a drug to reverse the effects of Pradaxa – one of a newer breed of blood thinners.

Pradaxa was approved by the FDA in 2010 to treat certain people at risk for stroke.

Four years later, Pradaxa’s maker agreed to a $650 million settlement. Because they were faced with 4,000 legal claims. Claims from people who hadn’t been warned that Pradaxa could cause uncontrolled bleeding.

In 2015, Praxbind – a drug that reverses Pradaxa’s effects was approved under the FDAs “fast track” approval program. Problem solved.

Then, in February 2016, news broke about another blood thinner. This time it was the drug Xarelto.

New research questioned a key study used to gain approval for Xarelto… which is used to treat the same stroke risk as Pradaxa.

It seems the Xarelto trial used equipment that had been recalled for inaccuracy in 2014. This could have invalidated the results of the trial. And Xarelto could have proven to be less safe than claimed.

Fortunately, a study published the following year found Xarelto was no less safe than warfarin. It appears we dodged a bullet on that one. But that didn’t make the risk any less real.

And the problem isn’t just with drug companies or the FDA. Every aspect of this issue seems to be broken. Even how doctors prescribe drugs can seem crazy.

Don’t Solve the Problem; Manage the Result

Imagine for a moment you’re a city manager. A water line serving the heart of downtown has ruptured, and many of your city’s most important businesses suddenly have little or no water.

What do you do? Do you direct the fire department to deliver water daily to every downtown business… from now until the problem solves itself? Or do you repair the damaged water main?

I think the answer’s pretty obvious. Yet doctors don’t seem to be taking this approach when it comes to the type II diabetes epidemic.

A report in the journal Obesity uncovered the insane truth. Doctors in the U.S. have no less than six anti-obesity drugs available. Yet they prescribe diabetes medications 15 times more often than anti-obesity drugs.

Here’s the thing: Obesity is a major cause of diabetes. Get Americans’ weight down, and the rate of diabetes will drop like a stone. Yet doctors prescribe anti-obesity drugs for only 2% of those who might benefit.

They’ve opted to have the fire department deliver water until the problem solves itself.

If that sounds crazy to you, it is. I’m not a big fan of anti-obesity drugs… but they’re a better option than a nation of diabetics.

And it just gets crazier.

How About a Side of “Oops!” With That Surgery?

A couple of years ago, doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital did something bold. They “tattled” on their own. And we should listen, because Mass General is one of the premier healthcare centers in the U.S.

Doctors there followed 277 surgical procedures. Direct observation made this study stand out. Earlier studies relied on self-reported data. So it was no surprise those earlier studies found few errors.

But when a third party – the Mass General team – followed the surgeries, they discovered a disturbing trend. In half of these cases, patients were either given wrong drugs… or drugs that came with unwanted side effects.

In practical terms, that’s a 50% failure rate. And this was at one of our premier hospitals! Imagine what the rate may be at the many lesser institutions across America.

And here’s the shocker… Every drug given to a patient is supposedly checked by the ordering doctor, the hospital pharmacist, and the nurse who hands out the pills. With three checks, mistakes still happen.

None of the errors in this study led to a death. But still… patients suffered because of preventable errors.

What else can go wrong? Well…

You’re Paying through the Nose for This Mess

We’ve seen problems with drug companies… the FDA… doctors… and even hospitals. Where else could things go wrong?

How about Congress?

You see, your lawmakers, in their infinite wisdom, have hamstringed Medicare. By law, Medicare can’t negotiate drug prices with Big Pharma.

Yup. Your blessed representatives sold your health to the highest bidder. And that bidder was Big Pharma. You never had a chance.

That’s why your drugs cost far, far more than drugs in other countries. Countries like the United Kingdom (UK).

In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS) provides healthcare to more than 60 million people. And pays among the lowest drug prices in the developed world.

The purchasing power of 64 million people isn’t something Big Pharma can ignore. And the NHS has used that power to negotiate favorable prices for most drugs.

One of the NHS’s tricks is to rate the effectiveness of drugs. A high-cost drug that delivers fewer benefits may not even be approved for purchase at all. And that means the maker of that drug earns ZERO in the UK.

The system isn’t perfect, but most drugs cost a fraction of their U.S. price in the UK.

You’ll find a similar system – and similarly lower prices – in virtually every developed country outside the U.S.

So, what can you do about this mess?

Use the Power of Numbers

If there’s one thing your representatives in Washington fear more than Big Pharma, it’s losing their cushy jobs. And you can play this to your advantage.

According to government statistics, more than 55 million people are covered by Medicare. With another 71.6 million covered by the Medicaid program. That’s more than 126 million people – about 38% of our country’s population.

With that kind of bargaining power, Medicare and Medicaid could bring down drug prices sharply. But you’ll have to lean on your representatives.

If your senators or congressman think for one minute they’ll have to get a real job if they don’t abandon Big Pharma, they’ll jump ship in a heartbeat. And only you can convince them.

Finally, we need to demand that the FDA step back from its dependence on the very companies it’s supposed to regulate.

Right now, the FDA depends on Big Pharma for a significant portion of its funding. And that makes for too cozy a relationship. The drug companies simply have too much influence.

America has a drug problem. And it’s only going to get worse… unless we step in to stop it. Fortunately, that’s pretty easy.

Go to https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials to find out how to contact your senators and representative in the House. Then send a sharply worded e-mail. Or call.

Now is the perfect time to demand action… because it’s an election year. And an awful lot of lawmakers are running scared. You may never have a better opportunity to make your drugs cheaper and safer.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


“FDA approves drug to reverse blood thinner Pradaxa,” KDWN.com. Oct 18, 2015.

“Investigation casts doubt over trial used to support top-selling anti-clotting drug,” ScienceDaily. Feb 4, 2016.

Russo-Alvarez, G., et al, “Thromboembolic and Major Bleeding Events With Rivaroxaban Versus Warfarin Use in a Real-World Setting,” Annals of Pharmacotherapy. 2018; 52(1): 19-25.

“Doctors prescribe diabetes treatment medications 15 times more than obesity drugs,” ScienceDaily. Aug 29, 2016.

Navarro, A., “Medication Errors, Unwanted Drug Side Effects Seen In Half Of Surgeries,” TechTimes. Oct 26, 2015.

Quinn, A., “Why Drugs Cost Less in the U.K. Than in the U.S.,” Bloomberg Businessweek. Sep 4, 2017.


© Copyright 2018 Discovery Health Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Posted in Drugs

5 Brain-Boosting Breakthroughs

Your grandparents probably knew “fish is brain food.” But not much else about sharpening your brain. Even doctors used to believe mental decline was inevitable with age. “It’s all part of growing older,” they told us.

Now we know better. Research uncovers new brain-boosting secrets all the time. If the media can make a sensational headline from these breakthroughs, then you may hear about them. But many others get very little attention.

Today, I’ll share five recent brain breakthroughs you may not have heard about.

#1 – A simple way to slow brain shrinkage.

Studies show most people suffer from “brain shrinkage” as they get older. This shrinkage is linked to memory problems and a loss of cognitive function. But what if you could block brain loss?

Research from Cambridge University suggests you can.

Scientists there looked at 527 adults aged 20 to 87. They discovered that being overweight or obese in middle age was linked to greater loss of brain matter. In fact, in the worst cases, obesity aged adult’s brains by an extra 10 years.

This suggests dropping excess weight in middle age may help you stay sharper longer.

#2 – A brain-boosting workout

German doctors looked at the effect of exercise on a group of retirees’ brains. They discovered riding an exercise bike for 30 minutes just 3 times a week made a big difference.

First, they compared levels of the chemical choline in the brains of their volunteers. Then half the volunteers took up the cycling regimen for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, choline levels in the cyclers stabilized at lower levels than in the non-cyclers.

This is important, because the breakdown of brain cells raises choline levels. Just cycling three times a week appeared to slow the age-related breakdown of brain cells.

And here’s even more good news…

#3 – Everyday Activities Preserve Gray Matter

A team at Rush University published a groundbreaking study in February. To begin with, the volunteers in this study were 81 on average. That’s 10 years older than most similar studies.

And the results weren’t based on reported activity levels. The Rush team used a device called an accelerometer to measure actual activity levels. So their results are much more precise.

What did they find? Everyday activities help preserve brain matter. Activities like walking the dog, gardening, or doing housework.

The Rush team showed – even at 80 – staying active can help keep you sharper. And you don’t have to be a marathoner to do it.

Just shut off the TV, get out of your chair, and move.

On the other side of the coin…

#4 – Don’t Ignore the Blues

Australian scientists compared 7,199 healthy adults to 1,728 who suffered from depression. They found seriously depressed adults showed greater shrinkage in the hippocampus. That’s an area of the brain closely linked to memory and learning.

The study also found that dealing with major depression early on could ease the shrinkage problem.

While drugs are often used to treat depression, they’re not necessarily the only way to ease a recurring case of the blues. For example, physical activity has been shown to combat depression.

And, as we already noted, it also helps preserve brain matter.

Finally, Let’s see how to eat your way to a bigger brain.

#5 – Food Choices Can Shrink Your Brain

As the old saying goes, “You are what you eat.” Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, realized this some 23 centuries ago. “Let food be your medicine,” he wrote, “and medicine be your food.”

When it comes to your brain, that’s especially good advice.

Australian scientists compared people’s diets to the size of their brains’ memory centers. What they found was bad news for most Americans.

Because junk food leads to a smaller hippocampus – a key center of learning and memory. On the other hand, nutrient-dense foods – like fruits and vegetables – lead to a bigger hippocampus.

In other words, the “Standard American Diet” is bad for your brain. But diets like the Mediterranean Diet could help you hold on to more brain cells – and keep you sharper.

Swap that burger and fries for sole and asparagus, and you just may remember that meal a whole lot longer.

So What’s the Take-Away Here?

It’s all good news. Because these studies say you can have a remarkable amount of control over your mental future.

How you eat… how active you are… and how well you control your weight could help you control how sharp you are 10, 20, or 30 years from now.

And, as the Rush University study showed, it’s never too late to get started. You just have to start…

  • Move more. Create a garden in your front yard. Take a daily after-dinner stroll. Volunteer.
  • Don’t let depression fester. Deal with the blues as soon as you feel them. Talk to your doctor. Get moving. Plan healthier meals. These easy steps can all help.
  • Make healthier food choices. Have seconds on vegetables instead of starches. Swap out sugary desserts in favor of fruit. Eat oily fish twice a week.

Nobody can remove all their risk of mental decline. But these studies show you have a lot of control. And why wouldn’t you want to stay mentally sharp as long as you can?

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Ronan, L., et al, “Obesity associated with increased brain age from midlife,” Neurobiol Aging. Nov 2016; 47: 63-70.

Matura, S., et al, “Effects of aerobic exercise on brain metabolism and grey matter volume in older adults,” Transl Psychiatry. Jul 2017; 7(7): e1172.

“Everyday Activities Associated With More Gray Matter in Brains of Older Adults,” Rush University. Feb 13, 2018.


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More Than 1 in 3 Americans at Risk of Medically Induced Depression

Next time you’re in a group of people, look at the person to your right. Then look at the person on your left. Chances are at least one of you is at risk of depression. Depression caused by prescription drugs you’re taking.

That’s the conclusion of a major new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Over 37% of American adults – 37.2%, to be exact – are currently taking at least one drug that may cause depression.

Of course, not everyone at risk will suffer from medically induced depression. But you should know the risk, because there’s a good chance the medical mainstream won’t warn you.

And don’t think, “It can’t be me. I don’t take any of those exotic drugs.” Because depression is a serious risk for people taking some of today’s most commonly prescribed drugs.

Here’s what you need to know.

Millions at Risk… Many Unaware

Let’s be honest here. If you’re taking a prescription drug, did you really read the whole insert that came with the bottle? You know, that tiny rectangle of paper that opens into a large sheet covered with tiny – almost invisible – type.

Your doctor can’t memorize all that information for every drug. So she may have made some comments – usually along the lines of take it with food… avoid alcohol… or something along those lines.

The pharmacy tech (When was the last time you dealt with an actual pharmacist?) may have asked you to sign something that says they explained the drug. Or, at least, they tried to. But most people seem to decline the long explanations.

Besides, you trust your doctor. She’d never prescribe something that might cause problems. Especially for a common problem like heartburn, high blood pressure, or the like.

All that helps explain why so many people at risk often don’t realize the position they’re in.

The study followed a total of 26,192 adults in five 2-year cycles of a national health survey.

Taking one of these medications raised the risk of depression. But taking three – and 6.9% in the survey did – more than tripled the risk.

Why You Should Be Concerned

Of course, the big question is, “Am I at risk?”

If you take any prescription drug, you should probably assume the answer is, “Yes,” until you know otherwise. Because you could find yourself in the position of taking yet another drug – an anti-depressant – to fight the effects of a drug you’re currently changing.

That’s good news for Big Pharma, who’ll profit off the side effects of their products. But not good news for you. Because the side effects of anti-depressants can be really serious.

So, to get you started, here are just a few classes the drugs that may trigger depression…

  • Statins – Statins are used to lower cholesterol levels. But one of cholesterol’s jobs is to help regulate release of neurotransmitters in the brain. Lowering cholesterol may interfere with this function, resulting in depression. Other cholesterol-lowering drugs may also have the same effect.
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors – PPIs are often prescribed to fight acid reflux or persistent heartburn. They work by reducing levels of stomach acid. Among their many side effects is a higher risk of depression… though doctors haven’t yet figured out why.
  • Anti-Anxiety Drugs and Sleep Aids – The class of hypnotics called benzodiazepines are known to raise the risk of depression. If your body lacks enough of the enzyme that metabolizes these drugs, the result can be depression. Older adults are especially at risk.
  • Beta-Blockers – These common drugs help lower high blood pressure. While doctors still don’t understand exactly why, one of the three most common side effects is depression.
  • Corticosteroids – These powerful anti-inflammatories may lower your levels of serotonin. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that helps regulate mood. In some people, these steroid drugs may trigger depression.

According to some sources, over 200 drugs are linked to a higher risk of depression. As good as your doctor may be, you can’t expect her – or him – to memorize the side effects of all these drugs. That’s why…

Your best defense is to take the time to read at least the “side effects” portion of those little rectangles of paper that come with your prescription. And let the pharmacy tech go through their spiel when you pick up a prescription.

If you’re not happy with the list of side effects, don’t be afraid to call your doctor’s office and ask for a different prescription. After all, you’re the one at risk here. And if you don’t look out for yourself, who will?

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Qato, D.M., et al, “Prevalence of Prescription Medications With Depression as a Potential Adverse Effect Among Adults in the United States,” JAMA. 2018; 319(22): 2289-2298.

Gander, K., “Depression Is a Potential Side Effect of Over 200 Common Prescription Drugs, Scientists Warn,” Newsweek. Jun 13, 2018.

Neel, A.B., “10 Types of Medications That Can Make You Feel Depressed,” AARP.com.


© Copyright 2018 Discovery Health Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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