You Are Not Roundup® Ready?

Fears and Facts About the World’s Most Common Herbicide

Recently, a “news” website dredged up a 5-year-old report on the herbicide glyphosate. Or, as it’s better known, Roundup®.

The report found links between glyphosate and many human health issues. Especially gluten intolerance. (Gluten is a protein in wheat and some other grains.)

The report has been hotly debated in scientific circles, but two facts stand out…

  • Gluten intolerance is growing by leaps and bounds.
  •  The use of glyphosate is up more than 100-fold since the late 1970s. It’s now the world’s most common weed killer.

New studies also link glyphosate to cancer.

So what’s the truth? Should you fear glyphosate? Is it dangerous? And what are its actual effects? Read on to discover what scientists know.

Will Glyphosate Wreck Your Digestion… or Worse?

Celiac disease is a rare – but serious – disease. It damages the small intestine. An autoimmune reaction to gluten, it can block nutrient absorption.

In 2013, two scientists published a paper in the journal Interdisciplinary Toxicology. The paper was one of a series on glyphosate’s effects. It claimed gluten intolerance was caused by glyphosate.

The paper has now been largely debunked. For example, researchers from Kings College London found problems with the authors’ reasoning.

But other issues may be more serious. The Kings College team found “evidence exists that glyphosate-based herbicides are toxic below regulatory set safety limits…”

This may be due, in part, to overuse. For example…

  • Farmers now use over 100x more glyphosate than when first introduced.
  • The International Agency for Research on Cancer recently found glyphosate likely causes cancer in humans.
  • Glyphosate is a serious pollutant in air, drinking water, and even rain.
  • “Safe” exposure limits are based on outdated science.

How Much Is “Safe”? Not Much

In 2015, French researchers looked at glyphosate risks. They found it may pose a threat at levels below those first deemed safe. These risks include…

  • Liver and kidney damage
  • Cancer
  • Abnormal embryonic development.

Scientists at the University of California also question glyphosate’s safety. In 2018, they found cancer risk is higher than originally thought. They pointed to several situations – hard to test in the 1970s – that may explain the new findings.

A 2018 international paper – published in Environmental Health – also found a problem.  Analysis shows industry-sponsored studies have found glyphosate safer than independent studies. And favoring industry studies is a weakness in current European regulations.

Meanwhile, we may be overlooking another serious issue with glyphosate.

The Rise of the Superweeds

Glyphosate is designed to boost crop yields. Genetically engineered crops could be safely doused. This would kill weeds, but spare Roundup-Ready® crops.

But this has the same effect as overusing antibiotics. The targets are developing resistance.

Many bacteria are now resistant to even our strongest antibiotics. Repeated exposure let them build defenses against these drugs. Now some bacteria are almost impossible to kill.

The same thing is happening on farms around the world. Crops designed to resist glyphosate let farmers use more weed killer. Now some weeds are resistant.

In 2014, scientists identified 24 species of weed resistant to Roundup®.

By 2018, that number had grown to 38. According to U.S. scientists, these resistant weeds are common in 37countries. And they affect 34 important crops. Scientists also found resistance in 6 non-crop scenarios.

This report also noted we haven’t developed a new type of weed killer in over 30 years.

Fortunately, you’re not stuck with this situation.

How to Avoid This Potential Poison

Farmers are dumping huge amounts of glyphosate on their crops. It’s invading our air and water. But you can lower your exposure.

The easiest way to cut your exposure is to go organic.

Organic foods are produced without commercial fertilizers, insecticides, or herbicides. Yes, organic food is more expensive than conventional crops. But it doesn’t come with the load of toxins found on non-organic foods.

Glyphosate may not raise your risk of gluten issues. But there’s good evidence it may boost your risk of cancer. Which is far worse. And far harder to deal with.

Going organic can help you avoid exposure to toxins like glyphosate. Organic foods may also be higher in key nutrients. So it’s a win all the way around. A win that may spare you or a loved one the heartache of cancer down the line.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Samsel, A. and Seneff, S., “Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance,” Interdiscip Toxicol. Dec 2013; 6(4): 159–184.

Mesnage, R. and Antoniou, M.N., “Facts and Fallacies in the Debate on Glyphosate Toxicity,” Front Public Health. Nov 24, 2017; 5: 316.

Myers, J.P., et al, “Concerns over use of glyphosate-based herbicides and risks associated with exposures: a consensus statement,” Environ Health. 2016; 15: 19.

Mesnage, R., et al, “Potential toxic effects of glyphosate and its commercial formulations below regulatory limits,” Food Chem Toxicol. Oct 2015; 84: 133-153.

Davoren, M.J. and Schiesti, R.H., “Glyphosate-based herbicides and cancer risk: a post-IARC decision review of potential mechanisms, policy and avenues of research,” Carcinogenesis. Oct 8, 2018; 39(10): 1207-1215.

Landrigan, P.J. and Belpoggi, F., “The need for independent research on the health effects of glyphosate-based herbicides,” Environ Health. May 29, 2018; 17(1): 51.

Heap, I., “Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds,” Pest Manag Sci. Sep 2014; 70(9): 1306-1315.

Heap, I. and Duke, S.O., “Overview of glyphosate-resistant weeds worldwide,” Pest Manag Sci. May 2018; 74(5): 1040-1049.


© Copyright 2018 Discovery Health Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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The Real Cost of That Energy Drink

Americans spent a whopping $13.4 billion dollars on energy drinks in 2015. That’s about $42 for every man, woman, and child in the country!

What are you getting for that $42? A lot more than the industry promises, that’s for sure. And the “lot more” is all bad.

For example, a single 16-ounce energy drink can raise your blood pressure by more than 6%. That jump may be temporary… but millions of Americans already have elevated blood pressure. And millions drink more than one energy drink a day.

Read on to discover the real costs of that “energy boost.”

Courting Heart Trouble, One Can at a Time

According to researchers at the Mayo Clinic, energy drinks have already been linked to “serious cardiovascular events.” Curious as to how this happens, they designed a simple experiment.

They split a group of volunteers into two groups. Both groups were given a single drink. One group got an energy drink. The other drank a look-alike that had none of the stimulants in the energy drink.

A half-hour after the drink, the doctors compared their volunteers’ blood pressure to pre-drink levels. The placebo group showed no change. In the energy drink group, though, average blood pressure shot up by 6.4%.

Norepinephrine levels also surged in the energy drink group. This is the hormone responsible for the “fight-or-flight” response. It raises blood pressure and heart rate and triggers a rush of sugar into your system.

Less than two weeks later, the doctors switched groups. The former placebo group now got the energy drink. The original energy drink group now got the placebo. The results were the same. The energy drink resulted in higher norepinephrine levels and a boost in blood pressure.

And all it took was a single can. If you drink multiple cans a day, the effects may be prolonged or magnified.

This wasn’t the first – or the last – study to show energy drinks increase heart risk.

Danger Higher for the Uncaffeinated

In another study, Mayo Clinic scientists found energy drinks don’t have the same effect on everyone. If you’re not used to a lot of caffeine, the effects are even stronger.

This study looked at people who got less than 160 mg of caffeine a day – the amount in about 1-1/2 cups of coffee. Their blood pressure shot up even higher than folks who do get more caffeine.

In fact, the low-caffeine group saw blood pressure spikes twice as high as the caffeine group!

A new study from Houston’s UT Health (UTH) reports a single energy drink can also damage blood vessels.

The UTH team looked at a measure called “flow-mediated dilation.” This measures the response of arteries to increased blood flow. It’s frequently used to determine artery health.

Volunteers – all healthy young adults – each drank one 24-ounce energy drink. Ninety minutes later, doctors measured their arteries’ response to increased blood flow.

They found the volunteers’ arteries were 45% less responsive than before the energy drink.

Keep in mind all three of these studies looked at the effects of just one energy drink. Many people drink two or more per day.

Should You Worry?

If you have high blood pressure, energy drinks are not your friends. The same applies if you have any heart health risks.

A modest amount of caffeine may confer some health benefits. But these drinks usually have more than just caffeine. Many contain other herbs – along with a significant amount of added sugar.

There’s really nothing healthy about energy drinks. And you can boost your energy safely in other ways…

  • Eat foods low on the glycemic index. In other words, get more fiber and fewer refined carbohydrates. Low-glycemic foods help you avoid mid-morning and mid-afternoon “crashes.”
  • Exercise regularly. Burning energy to feel more energetic may sound strange. But regular exercise helps your body run more efficiently. So you’ll feel less dragged out.
  • Manage stress. Stress leads to fatigue. Mindfulness meditation, yoga, tai chi, and many other activities can ease stress levels. So you feel less drained.
  • Avoid drinking too much alcohol. Alcohol is a depressant. Even worse, it makes you sleepy while lowering sleep quality.

There’s really no reason to resort to energy drinks. Most brands deliver all the disadvantages of soft drinks – but with added risks. If you really need a quick “pick-me-up,” try a handful of almonds or walnuts instead.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Richter, F., “Energy Drinks,” Statista.com. Feb 19, 2014.

“Energy Drink Increases Blood Pressure, Norepinephrine Levels,” JAMA Network. Nov 8, 2015.

Klein, T., “Energy Drinks Raise Resting Blood Pressure, Dramatic In Those Not Used To Caffeine,” Mayo Clinic. Mar 13, 2015.

“Just one energy drink may hurt blood vessel function,” AHA/ASA Newsroom. Nov 5, 2018.


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Pointless Medical Tests May Be Sucking You Dry… And Putting Your Life at Risk!

The news came like a gut-punch. Americans are spending $200 billion every year for unnecessary medical tests and treatments. And it’s not just hitting us in the wallet.

Because these pointless procedures lead to an avoidable 30,000 deaths each year!

These wasteful tests and treatments have another effect. They may cause delays in needed treatment. When Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center recently eliminated pointless testing, it made a huge difference.

The hospital cut the waiting time for cataract surgery by six whole months!

Unnecessary tests and treatments are a major sticking point across the entire U.S. healthcare system. Doctors often say they’re a sign of cautious treatment… That they lower risks and save money in the long run.

But the truth is… they do just the opposite.

Here’s what you need to know to protect yourself…

More Care… More Cost

According to PBS News Hour, overtreatment and over-testing occur for complaints ranging from C-sections to blood draws.

Over-cautious doctors order more tests to “cover their butts”… and use aggressive treatment options to ensure a positive outcome. Even when they’re not called for. It’s called “defensive medicine.”

Plus, some hospitals see a financial incentive to run more tests more often.

The result is shocking. According to a self-study at Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, their doctors only treated 6% of patients reviewed over 3 years according to medical standards.

The rest were over-tested or over-treated.

Patients whose doctors didn’t follow the guidelines were more likely to be re-admitted, suffer with complications, and spend more time in the hospital.

That’s right. More care led to even more care. And more cost. And the bottom line comes down to you paying more out of pocket.

Caution is one thing. But you’re paying for laziness in far too many cases.

Same Day… Same Test… Double the Charge

Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital looked at tests ordered in emergency rooms… and then ordered when patients were moved out of emergency to a tertiary hospital.

On average, each patient had one test performed in emergency ordered again when they were moved out of emergency. These unnecessary duplicate tests were all ordered within 12 hours of the originals.

And here’s the shocker: These tests were ordered even though the results of the original tests came back “normal.”

A 2014 study found 41% of tests ordered in intensive care units (ICU) were unnecessary. The lion’s share was ordered on Mondays. The researchers also found some other surprising results.

Older patients accounted for more than half of ICU patients – and 63% of the deaths. Yet patients under 59 accounted for almost half of the tests ordered. And the number of unnecessary tests appears linked to the length of stay in the ICU.

Patients in the ICU for more than 10 days averaged 31 unnecessary tests. Those in the ICU for less than 10 days, averaged only 19.

In other words, people stuck in the ICU for over 10 days had an average of 3 tests they didn’t need per day… while those who spent less than 10 days “only” suffered through an average of 2 unnecessary tests per day.

A Middle Eastern study found 3 tests accounted for 11% of all the unnecessary tests…

Your Dollars at Waste… And a Solution

U.S. News and World Report found Americans waste at least $500 billion on unnecessary breast cancer treatments alone. Every year.

According to the authors, experts caution that the more tests taken, the more likely one will result in a false positive. Which results in billions in unnecessary treatments.

U.S. News also warns against multiple referrals. The more referrals to specialists, the more likely a “problem” will be found. They also note multiple referrals may be a sign your primary care doctor is overwhelmed.

AARP also suggests the following tests may be unnecessary…

  • Yearly stress tests and electrocardiograms
  • PET scans for Alzheimer’s disease
  • Annual PAP tests
  • Testosterone for erectile dysfunction
  • Upper-tract imaging for enlarged prostate

And these are just a drop in the bucket. Doctors estimate more than $80 billion dollars are wasted on pointless back pain treatments every year. Along with billions more on PSA screens and colonoscopies.

The bottom line – as with so many other medical situations – is to ask, “Why?”

If a doctor orders a test already given recently, ask, “Why?” If a doctor orders a test that doesn’t seem related to other tests, ask, “Why?”

Don’t accept, “Just to be safe,” as a reason. Every test should be for a reason. And every treatment should have a specific cause.

Defensive medicine protects doctors from lawsuits. But it also costs ordinary Americans like you billions of dollars. And potentially exposes you to unnecessary risk.

Don’t let a loved one become one of the 30,000 a year slain by unnecessary tests and treatments. Simply asking, “Why?” could lead to a different – and healthier – outcome.

Many healthcare organizations are fighting the scourge of over-testing and overtreatment. Help them by asking the questions they’d ask if they were there.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


“The $200 billion perils of unnecessary medical tests,” PBS News Hour. May 24, 2017.

Rogg, J., et al, “The Frequency and Cost of Redundant Laboratory Testing for Transferred Emergency Department Patients,” Oct 2012; 60(4): S13.

Anderson, M.O., et al, “Prevalence of unnecessary laboratory tests and related avoidable costs in intensive care unit,” J Bras Patol Med Lab. Dec 2014; 50(6): 410-416.

Khalifa, M. and Parwaiz, K., Reducing Unnecessary Laboratory Testing Using Health Informatics Applications: A Case Study on a Tertiary Care Hospital,” 2014; 37: 253-260.

Schroeder, M.O., “Signs of Overtreatment: How to Avoid Unnecessary Care,” U.S. News and World Report. Aug 18, 2015.

Agnvall, E., “10 Medical Tests to Avoid,” AARP Bulletin. Dec 2015.

Mercer, M., “7 More Medical Procedures,” AARP. Feb 2013.


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Warning: Not All Drug Studies Tell the Truth

When a study comes out in support of an herb, mainstream medicine loves to cry foul. The sample was too small, they say. Or the study wasn’t long enough. Or – their favorite – the study was simply biased.

Of course pro-drug studies are just as small. Or just as short. But bias? That can be tough to pinpoint. Just thinking an herb might work may be enough for a claim of bias.

Well, it’s time to put the shoe on the other foot. But, in this case, you may be in real danger. Because drug industry bias may have you taking a medicine that doesn’t really work. Or may have dangerous side effects.

Here’s the story…

Drug Studies: You Get What You Pay For

Back in 2003, scientists searched two large study databases. They went through more than 20 years of studies in Embase and over 30 years in the Medline database, run by Uncle Sam.

Three scientists settled on 30 studies to review. They looked at how many of the studies were favorable and who sponsored those studies.

On average, studies paid for by the drug industry were four times more likely to be favorable than studies not sponsored by drug companies. Their conclusion?

“Systematic bias favours products which are made by the company funding the research.”

This was no fly-by-night study, either. It was published in the prestigious British Medical Journal.

In 2008, a University of York study also looked at bias in drug trials. This study looked at reviews of research that looked for evidence of bias. (Sort of a study of studies)

This time, the researchers combed through 10 medical study databases. They included 6 large reviews in their study…

  • Two reviews found studies funded by drug companies stated risks as lower than studies funded from outside the industry.
  • In four reviews they found drugs were more likely to be deemed “safe” in industry-funded studies. Even when the risk of harmful effects was high.

The researchers found Big Pharma’s studies usually reported the results correctly… but were far more likely to “spin” results to look favorable.

Over the years, review after review has found similar results.

Don’t Be Fooled By Big Pharma’s Smoke and Mirrors

Most magicians are honest. They’ll tell you right out that real magic doesn’t exist. Not Big Pharma, though. They want you to swallow their smoke and mirrors act… because that’s how they make a lot of their money.

One of their cleverest tricks is the “disappearing study.”

You may have thought every study is considered when evaluating a new drug for use. That’s not true. The drug industry often decides not to publish studies. In essence, they cherry-pick the studies they use to back their applications.

In 2016, a team from the United Kingdom reviewed 15 medical databases for comparisons of results of published vs. unpublished studies.

They found 46% of published studies noted adverse events linked to the trial in question. But 95% of unpublished studies noted adverse events. In other words, favorable results see the light of day far more often than bad results.

“There is strong evidence that much of the information on adverse events remains unpublished,” the authors wrote, “and that the number and range of adverse events is higher in unpublished than in published versions of the same study.”

Wait. Run that by me again. There may be two different versions of the same study? And the published version is more likely to be favorable?

How’s that for smoke and mirrors?

More Big Pharma Tricks to Pull the Wool Over Your Eyes

In 2017, scientists at the University of Sydney revealed even more of the drug industry’s tricks.

Industry-funded studies, they found, may skew results by…

  • Designing the study to be favorable
  • Framing questions to lead to positive answers
  • Using questionable data analysis
  • Reporting results selectively
  • Spinning results for a positive result.

In this analysis, industry-sponsored studies were 34% more likely to show positive results.

“We need bias assessments tools for drug studies,” said senior author Prof. Lisa Bero, “that take funding source into account.” Because, “Currently, we have no validated way to detect or evaluate these subtle but systematic biases.”

So Big Pharma influences the results of studies. Quite possibly studies involved in drugs you take. What can you do?

Become Your Own Advocate

Your #1 defense is to ask questions. Why this drug? Are their safer alternatives? What are the risks? If this irritates your doctor, maybe you need a new doctor.

Read the patient information sheet that’s required for every prescription drug. Yes, it’s long. But better a long read than a short life. (Keep in mind Consumer’s Union found violations of FDA rules in 4 out of 5 inserts they reviewed in 2011.)

Search online for the generic drug name plus the word “risk.” Also for the generic drug name plus the words “adverse events.” Pay attention to the results from trusted sources, such as PubMed or well-known media resources.

You can’t protect yourself from all of Big Pharma’s deceptions. But – with a little effort – you can defend against some of the worst. Just being aware of the problem is a big step forward.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Lexchin, J., et al, “Pharmaceutical industry sponsorship and research outcome and quality: systematic review,” BMJ. 2003; 326.

Golder, S. and Loke, Y.K., “Is there evidence for biased reporting of published adverse effects data in pharmaceutical industry-funded studies?” Br J Clin Pharmacol. Dec 2008; 66(6): 767–773.

Golder, S., et al, “Reporting of Adverse Events in Published and Unpublished Studies of Health Care Interventions: A Systematic Review,” PLoS Med. Sep 2016; 13(9): e1002127.

“Industry funding biases drug trial studies in favor of sponsors’ products,” University of Sydney. Feb 21, 2017.

“Can You Read this Drug Label?” ConsumerReports.org. Jun 2011.


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Posted in Drugs

What They Don’t Tell You About Curcumin

You’ve probably heard a lot about curcumin in the last couple of years. Some claim it’s the answer to everything from cancer to Alzheimer’s disease. They point to hundreds of positive studies. But there’s one little detail these cheerleaders usually leave out…

Your body has an awful time absorbing curcumin.

Turmeric is the spice richest in curcumin. But you may absorb as little as 5% of the curcumin in an ordinary supplement. In other words, you spend a lot of money for very little benefit.

But there’s an easy way to get more active curcumin into your body. Here’s what you should know…

Turmeric’s Benefits Aren’t a Miracle… They’re Science

Recent curcumin studies have created quite a stir. Here are just a few of the benefits they’ve revealed about curcumin.  It…

  • Supports healthy blood sugar and blood pressure levels
  • Promotes clear arteries for normalized blood flow
  • Stimulates better mood and working memory improvements
  • Encourages healthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels
  • Promotes less joint pain and stiffness.

I could point to dozens of other ways curcumin boosts your health – from better digestion… to eye and skin health… to exercise recovery. And so much more.

Curcumin works by blocking inflammation triggers.

You see, your body faces two kinds of inflammation: acute and chronic. Acute inflammation happens when you’re injured.

You may cut your hand or twist your ankle. The injured area quickly turns red and swells. This is caused by defensive molecules that begin repairs. It’s normal and natural.

But a poor diet, air pollution, stress, and many other factors cause low-level, chronic inflammation. It’s as if your body thinks it’s been injured everywhere… but just a little bit. That triggers release of small amounts of the same defensive agents your body uses to fight a cut or sprain.

When this low-level defense goes on and on, it leads to damage. And almost every health problem you can imagine. Heart trouble… sore, aching joints… abnormal cell division… even memory problems.

Curcumin can block the triggers that cause this low-level response. And thus defend against the damage they cause.

Well it can if you can absorb it. That’s why you need to know this little secret.

Making Curcumin Available – and Multiplying Its Power

Scientists working at St. John’s University discovered there’s an herb that boosts curcumin absorption. And not by just a little. By as much as 2,000%!

It’s called piperine. Combine it with turmeric, and you can absorb a lot more curcumin… and get the full benefit. And there’s only one form of piperine that’s been granted a patent for its ability to boost nutrient absorption.

It’s called BioPerine® – and it’s one reason Curcumin Triple Burn is different from ordinary turmeric supplements.

Anti-aging expert Dr. Al Sears formulated Curcumin Triple Burn to give your body the strongest defenses possible. That’s why he added three more potent herbs to back up curcumin’s anti-irritant action.

Ginger root inhibits a molecule called Nuclear Factor-kappa beta (NF- kB). NF-kB helps control more than 400 genes linked to systemic irritation. That’s why Dr. Sears saw ginger as a perfect complement to curcumin.

He also added galangal – a little-known anti-microbial herb – and holy basil.

Holy basil is an adaptogen, an herb that helps your body deal with stress. Research shows it helps ease levels of cortisol, your body’s main stress hormone. Less stress, less cortisol, less systemic irritation.

Finally: A Turmeric Supplement That Really Works

Dr. Sears has spent decades searching for herbal solutions in the most inaccessible places on Earth. And he’s poured all his years of experience and expertise into Curcumin Triple Burn.

This unique formula features a full 1,000 mg of turmeric root… BioPerine® for maximum absorbability… and three herbal “boosters” to enhance curcumin’s effectiveness. There’s simply nothing else like it available anywhere.

You can maximize your defenses against the low-level irritation that leads to joint pain, heart trouble, and a host of other health issues. Simply by maximizing the potency of your turmeric supplement.

Stress, air pollution, toxins, and all the other irritants out there never take a rest. Your defenses shouldn’t, either.

Do what I do – and choose the maximum defenses of Curcumin Triple Burn.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Chuengsamarn S, et al., “Curcumin extract for prevention of type 2 diabetes,” Diabetes Care. Nov 2012; 35(11): 2121-2127.

Khajehdehi P., “Oral supplementation of turmeric decreases proteinuria, hematuria, and systolic blood pressure in patients suffering from relapsing or refractory lupus nephritis,” J Ren Nutr. Jan 2012; 22(1): 50-57.

“Curcumin May Prevent Clogged Arteries,” WebMd.com. Jul 20, 2009.

Cox, K.H., et al, “Investigation of the effects of solid lipid curcumin on cognition and mood in a healthy older population.” J Psychopharmacol. May 2015; 29(5): 642-651.

Shin, S.K., et al,. “Long-term curcumin administration protects against atherosclerosis via hepatic regulation of lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism,” Mol Nutr Food Res. Nov 7, 2011; 55(12): 1829-1840.

Yang, Y.S., “Lipid-lowering effects of curcumin in patients with metabolic syndrome,” Phytother Res. Dec 2014; 28(12): 1770-1777.

Belcaro, G., et al. “Efficacy and safety of Meriva®, a curcumin-phosphatidylcholine complex, during extended administration in osteoarthritis patients,” Alt Med Rev. Dec 2010; 15(4): 337-344.

Jothie, R.E., et al., “Anti-stress activity of Ocimum sanctum: Possible effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis,” Phytother Res. 2016; 30(5): 805-814.


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Here’s Why You Should Stop Taking Fish Oil

For years, nutrition experts have told you to take fish oil. It’s good for your heart… it may boost memory and mental clarity… and it’s a potent anti-inflammatory.

So why would I suggest you stop taking fish oil?

Because the latest research shows it’s not the best way to get your Omega-3s. If you’re still taking fish oil, you may be missing out on important benefits.

Fish Oil Delivers the Wrong Balance of Omega-3s

Read the label of almost any fish oil, and you’ll notice something. Fish oils have far more EPA than DHA. These two “marine” Omega-3s deliver most of fish oil’s benefits. But they’re not created equal.

For example, it’s the DHA in fish oil that’s key to healthy vision. You also have high levels of DHA in your brain. There, it’s critical for sending nerve signals efficiently.

Among its other jobs, DHA boosts immune function, fights inflammation, and improves the metabolism of individual cells.

DHA is a vital part of cell membranes. It blocks large LDL molecules from the muscle cells lining your arteries. So DHA supports normal flow in your arteries.

That’s not to say EPA isn’t useful. For example, it’s the main anti-inflammatory Omega-3. EPA also helps ease joint pain. It works by blocking the action of enzymes that trigger inflammation – such as the so-called “COX” enzymes.

With all DHA does, getting more may be a key to staying as healthy as possible.

Especially since most Americans don’t get enough.

Omega-3s May Be the Chink in Your Health Armor

A study funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) found people with higher levels of EPA and DHA in their blood have a lower risk of early death.

A second study found most people – in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East – don’t get enough Omega-3s. The Japanese and Scandinavians came out on top… probably because they eat a lot of fatty fish.

To get Americans up to the highest levels seen in the NHLBI study would require up to a gram of extra Omega-3s a day.

Only a handful of fish – such as mackerel, herring, and salmon – have that much in a single serving. And you’d have to eat a serving a day, while the guideline is only two servings a week.

Even then, you’d be getting far more EPA than DHA. Just as you would with most supplements. That’s where Omega Rejuvenol comes in.

A Better Way to Get Your Omega-3s… and More

Developed by nutrition pioneer Dr. Al Sears, Omega Rejuvenol replaces fish oil with two other marine Omega-3s: krill and calamari oils.

The calamari oil in Omega Rejuvenol is 50% DHA – the highest concentration I’ve ever seen. And krill, being at the bottom of the food chain, are as clean a source of Omega-3s as you’ll find.

Omega Rejuvenol also delivers key vitamins often low in our diet: Vitamins A, D3, and K2. Plus, it’s a good source of tocotrienols – forms of vitamin E very scarce in the Western diet.

Finally, Dr. Sears added the potent antioxidant astaxanthin. Studies suggest it may help normalize the balance between “good” and “bad” cholesterol… defend against narrowing of arteries… and even promote blood sugar control.

If you’re still taking fish oil, your supplement is out of date. Click here to read more about the power-boosting support of DHA-rich marine oils – and more – with Omega Rejuvenol

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Calder, P.C., “The DHA content of a cell membrane can have a significant influence on cellular

behaviour and responsiveness to signals,” Ann Nutr Metab. 2016; 69(suppl 1): 8–21.

Sears, B., “What Are The Real Differences Between EPA and DHA?” Psychology Today. Apr 1, 2012.

“Study finds link between high EPA and DHA omega-3 blood levels and decreased risk of death,” Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3s. Feb 21, 2017.

Kishimoto, Y., et al, “Potential Anti-Atherosclerotic Properties of Astaxanthin,” Mar Drugs. Feb 5, 2016; 14(2). pii: E35.


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Does New Study Really Show a Low-Carb Diet Is Deadly?

The headline says it all: “Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be
avoided.”

According to new research from Poland, following a low-carb diet raises your risk of cancer, heart disease, and stroke. Plus, a low-carb lifestyle boosts your risk of an early death by almost a third!

Really? Or is this another case of medical fear-mongering?

Before you start adding mounds of pasta back into your diet, here’s what you need to know.

It Looks Like Someone’s Jumping to Conclusions

Just because two things exist side by side, it’s not proof one causes the other. Scientists put it this way: “Correlation is not causation.”

It’s easy to jump to conclusions when two things seem to pop up together consistently. For example, look at my recent message on osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease.

Studies show that people with osteoporosis are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s. But the best research suggests it’s not because osteoporosis leads to Alzheimer’s. It’s more likely they have common risk factors.

This new study only found that low-carb diets and a higher risk of certain health issues exist side by side. It doesn’t prove the one causes the other.

In fact, the results of this study are way out of line with what its own authors found in other studies.

Violating the Cardinal Rule of Proof

The Polish study’s authors reviewed seven similar studies. And the numbers they found weren’t even close to theirs.

The risk of early death in the other studies was half their finding. The heart disease risk in the other studies was less than a third. And the cancer risk was below 25% of their number.

In other words, seven other studies found a correlation… but it was just a fraction of the new study’s results.

Another number that didn’t match up? Follow-up. The other seven studies average follow-up was 15.6 years. The new study had an average follow-up of just 6.4 years. Getting such highly inflated results in such a short time should set off alarm bells.

The press release for this new study may contain its own explanation for the alarming results.

Not All Low-Carb Diets Are Healthy

General dietary descriptions can be misleading. For instance, years ago, I worked with a young vegetarian lady. She knew vegetarians lived longer than average, and was convinced she should avoid meat.

But her “vegetarian” diet consisted largely of fast-food burgers (without the beef patty) with French fries… meatless pizza… and other questionable food choices. Technically, she was a vegetarian, but her diet was anything but healthy.

A low-carb diet can be the same. If you replace complex carbs with red meat and saturated fat, you’re not doing yourself any favors. Even though you’re technically following a low-carb diet.

And the new study’s authors seem to admit this when they point out, “The reduced intake of fiber and fruits and increased intake of animal protein, cholesterol, and saturated fat with these diets may play a role. Differences in minerals, vitamins and phytochemicals might also be involved.”

In other words, replacing complex carbs – like flour, pasta, and potatoes – with red meat and saturated fat may not be your best choice.

A healthy low-carb diet is low in complex carbs… but rich in fruits and vegetables. It appears the Polish study is really pointing out that eating an unhealthy diet may be linked to poor health.

A 2018 study published by The Lancet came to exactly that conclusion. In this study, people who substituted red meat and fat for carbs had a higher risk of early death. But those who swapped out complex carbs for fruits and veggies lowered their risk.

There Is Such a Thing as a Healthy Low-Carb Lifestyle

A 2014 study in the Annals of Internal Medicine compared a low-fat diet to a low-carb diet. After a year, volunteers on the low-carb diet had lost 7.7 pounds more than the low-fat group. The low-carb group also saw a bigger drop in blood fats linked to heart disease.

In 2015, an international team of doctors recommended a low-carb diet to help control Type II diabetes.

The doctors (more than two dozen of them!) pointed out a low-carb diet beats low-fat for controlling blood sugar, weight loss, and more. In fact, the group found twelve points in favor of a low-carb diet.

And a 20-year-long study from Harvard School of Public Health found no link between low-carb diets and higher heart disease risk. But the study did find replacing complex carbs with plant foods lowered the risk of heart disease.

Should You Go Low-Fat? The Bottom Line

Complex carbohydrates are not your friends. A moderate amount of whole grains isn’t bad. But most products today are “made with whole grains” – or “contain whole grains.” Which means you’re really getting mostly processed carbs.

And processed carbs lead to blood sugar spikes… which can lead to diabetes.

High-carb diets are also linked to obesity, which can cause a whole laundry list of health problems. Like heart disease, arthritis, and stroke.

A low-carb lifestyle beats low-fat hands down in battling obesity, maintaining lean muscle mass, easing blood fat issues, defeating diabetes, and more. Just be smart about it.

Replace complex carbs with veggies – especially dark and brightly colored options. Red peppers are loaded with fiber and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables deliver lutein, vitamin K, and essential minerals. Broccoli is a rich source of sulforaphanes – plant compounds that battle cancer.

Skinless, free-range poultry… grass-fed beef… and wild-caught fish are great sources of protein – along with other nutrients missing from their factory-farmed counterparts.

And, of course, eat a moderate amount of fruits and nuts.

Can a low-carb diet cause an early death? If you replace the carbs with factory-farmed bacon and saturated fats, probably. But if you eat a diet rich in gunpowder, you chance the same effect.

Any time you add too much of a good thing, you risk hurting your health.

You need protein. You need fats. Even saturated fats. But you don’t need too much of them.

A low-carb lifestyle that includes plenty of fruits and veggies – only a moderate amount of protein and dietary fats – isn’t likely to boost your risk of an early death. In fact, as the folks at Harvard found, it may do just the opposite.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


“Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided,” European Society of Cardiology. Aug 28, 2018.

Seidelmann, S.B., et al, “Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis,” The Lancet Public Health. Published Online Aug 16, 2018.

“Comparing Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets,” Ann Intern Med. 2014; 161(5): I-22.

Feinman, R.D., et al, “Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence base,” Nutrition. 2015; 13: 1–13.

“20-year Study Finds No Association Between Low-carb Diets And Risk Of Coronary Heart Disease,” Science Daily. Nov 9, 2006.


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Even Worse Than Your Worst Health Nightmare

We fear a handful of diseases more than others. And rightfully so.

Diseases like osteoporosis. Many sufferers – especially women – don’t realize they have it until they begin to shrink… or develop the so-called “widow’s hump.”

Osteoporosis leaves you fragile. Like a delicate porcelain doll, even a slight bump or misstep can leave you broken… shattered. Fear of fractures has sidelined millions of formerly active adults.

Osteoporosis – weak, brittle bones – rates as a top fear among mature adults. For active seniors, it’s a nightmare.

Dementia – the slipping away of your mind, memory, and identity – is another nightmare that haunts us.

So imagine if the two were connected. If having osteoporosis also raised your risk of dementia.

Well, it does. Here’s what you need to know to build your defenses now.

Huge Study Links Osteoporosis and Dementia

A team of German and French doctors followed the health of almost 60,000 adults for 20 years. What they found was developing osteoporosis raises your risk of dementia up to about 30%.

The doctors compared 29,983 adults with osteoporosis to 29,983 healthy adults. After 20 years, they found men with osteoporosis were 20% more likely to develop dementia. Among women, the risk rose by 30%.

This wasn’t the first study to reach this conclusion. In 2014, Chinese researchers published a similar study. This research showed a 46% higher risk of any dementia among patients with osteoporosis. And a 39% higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

A 2017 European analysis of studies also found a link, but the authors took their research a step further. And that may be the good news here.

There’s No Proof Osteoporosis Leads to Dementia

The European team combed through 66 years of studies. They discovered scientists saw a link between osteoporosis and dementia… but no evidence the one causes the other.

But they did find evidence of similar risk factors for both diseases.

In other words, the two share some risk factors. Which may be why people with osteoporosis are more likely to develop dementia. It also means, working to prevent or reverse osteoporosis may also cut your risk of dementia.

Here’s what the scientists found…

You Can Control Risk Factors for Both Diseases

The two diseases have several common risk factors. The study only mentions one you can’t control, so let’s talk about that one first.

You have a gene called APOE. It carries the “plans” for a protein called apolipoprotein E. This protein links with fats to help carry cholesterol in your bloodstream.

APOE has several variants. One of these – APOE4 – is linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). People with the APOE4 variety of the gene are more likely to develop AD.

As it turns out, they’re also at a higher risk of osteoporosis.

The good news is that about half of all people have a different form of the APOE gene – called APOE3. Others have the APOE2 variant. So the chances are good you don’t have this risk factor anyway.

The scientists also found nutritional issues linked to higher risk for both dementia and osteoporosis. Two are especially easy to influence.

People with both these diseases tend to have lower levels of vitamins D and K than healthy adults. So, in theory, boosting your intake of these two vitamins should cut your risk.

To boost your vitamin K levels, eat more leafy green vegetables – such as spinach, chard, and kale. You can get smaller amounts from cabbage, broccoli, fish, meat and eggs.

Your best source of vitamin D is sunlight. Just 20 minutes of summer sun a day will trigger more than enough vitamin D for a person with “average” white skin. If your skin is darker, it will take longer. (Never stay in the sun long enough to burn!)

You can also get some vitamin D from fatty fish, beef liver, and vitamin-fortified foods. Or take a natural vitamin D supplement.

Both these vitamins help build bone mass. Higher levels are linked to a lower risk of dementia. And they may be an easy way to avoid your worst health nightmare.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Kostev, K., et al, “Impact of Osteoporosis on the Risk of Dementia in Almost 60,000 Patients Followed in General Practices in Germany,” Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Jul 21, 2018.

Chang, K.H., et al, “Increased risk of dementia in patients with osteoporosis: a population- based retrospective cohort analysis,” Age. Apr 2014; 36(2): 967-975.

Downey, C.L., et al, “Dementia and osteoporosis in a geriatric population: Is there a common link?” World J Orthop. May 18, 2017; 8(5): 412–423.


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3 Secrets to a Longer, More Active Life

In terms of longevity, the world saw two milestones in July 2018. Chiyo Miyako, the world’s oldest woman passed away at 117. And the world’s oldest man, Masazo Nonaka, celebrated his 113th birthday.

As you may have guessed by the names, both these “super-centenarians” are Japanese. Japan has more people over 100 than any other country. Last year, Japan boasted 67,824 people over 100.

Japan doesn’t just have the highest percentage of citizens over 100, either. The country enjoys the longest average life expectancy of any major industrialized nation.

Perhaps even more important, Japanese citizens generally enjoy 75 years or more of robust good health. Japanese seniors are healthier and more active on average than their peers anywhere in the world.

And science is beginning to unravel their secrets.

Okinawa – Japan’s Anti-aging “Blue Zone”

Perhaps you’ve heard of Blue Zones before. They’re spots where people tend to live much longer than average. Okinawa – a string of Japanese islands – has long held a place of honor among blue zones. Because Okinawans held the record for long, healthy lives for many, many years.

Okinawans have a mealtime tradition somewhat different from other cultures. Before each meal, Okinawans traditionally said, “Hara hachi bu.” It’s a reminder to eat only till you’re 80% full.

Calorie restriction is linked to longevity in some animal studies. So scientists believe the tradition of not eating till your full may contribute to the long life Okinawans have enjoyed for centuries.

The traditional Okinawan diet is also different from most other parts of the world.

Okinawans eat fish about 3 times a week. They rarely eat red meat. And their local vegetables are remarkably nutrient-dense.

According to Britain’s Guardian newspaper, “their purple sweet potatoes are rich in flavonoids, carotenoids, vitamin E and lycopene…” They also eat bitter melons and bitter cucumbers that are nutrient dense. Their diet includes lots of green tea and the spice turmeric. And at least two types of seaweed are a regular part of their diet.

But scientists have seen a change in the health status of younger Okinawans. Since the arrival of U.S. troops – and the fast food outlets that come in their wake – the life expectancy of Okinawans has begun to drop. Western foods may be erasing one of the world’s Blue Zones.

But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t follow Japan’s example.

This “Health Backwater” May Prove to Be the World’s Newest Blue Zone

Nagano Prefecture sits at the heart of the Japanese Alps. And at the heart of Japan.

Nagano is best known as the home to the 1998 Winter Olympics. But, in Japan, Nagano was also known for many years as the home of some of Japan’s shortest-lived citizens. If you lived in Nagano, your chances of a long life were pretty slim.

Then all that changed.

You see, Nagano is land-locked. Mountainous. And offers very little land suitable for farming. Men here had fairly high rates of stroke, heart disease, and other health problems.

Throughout the winter, Nagano’s residents ate lots of pickled vegetables – which are extremely high in salt. In fact studies showed people in Nagano ate 2 to 3 times the “safe” amount of salt in their diets.

So the government stepped in to change the local diet. And more.

Today, men in Nagano work well past the U.S. retirement age. And when they “retire,” many work on family farms – remaining active well into their 70s and 80s.

The people of Nagano eat far less salt then before… and focus their diet on healthier options. The result is a huge boost in life expectancy.

Women in Nagano now live an average of 87.2 years. Men average 80.9 years. And most of those years are healthy years. The turn-around has been so dramatic, the average life expectancy in Nagano is greater than in Okinawa.

AARP showcased an example of this dramatic turnaround in 2014.

When Takami Kuroiwa retired, he began working on the family farm. But, by the time he was 66, Kuroiwa had rejoined the workforce, and began working in the tourism industry.

But he still devoted 12 hours a day on weekends to the family farm. “It’s part of the lifestyle here, says Kuroiwa.” You work in an office and then you retire to the farm. It’s just the next stage in life.”

The combination of diet and activity seems to work. As I said, Nagano now outpaces Okinawa in terms of longevity.

But one Japanese researcher hopes to answer the longevity question once and for all.

Decades of Data Reveal Keys to Longevity

Professor Manami Inoue has been following the health of more than 100,000 Japanese adults since the 1990s.

Prof. Inoue’s volunteers were between 40 and 69 at the start of the study. And they’ve been checking in every 5 to 10 years since.

So far, the study has found – among other things…

  • Smoking boosts your risk of early death by 50%.
  • Drinking green tea lowers your risk of all-cause mortality.
  • Lifestyle is far more important than genetics when it comes to longevity.

Needless to say, the lifestyle discovery is the most significant. Because it shows you can make a big impact on how long you’ll live.

As younger Okinawans embrace Western habits, their life expectancy drops. But the people of Nagano have made the opposite change. Proving you can turn a dark future into a bright one… just by making a few simple changes in your life.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


“World’s oldest person Chiyo Miyako dies at 117 in Japan,” CBS News. Jul 27, 2018.

Mellen, R., “The world’s oldest man just turned 113. His secret? Eating candy,” The Washington Post. Jul 25, 2018.

Booth, M., “The Okinawa diet – could it help you live to 100?” The Guardian. Jun 19, 2013.

Spitzer, K., “Secrets From the Longest-Living Place on Earth,” AARP Bulletin. May 2014.

Dumé, B. “Unlocking The Secrets of Longevity in Japan,” Scientific American. Jul 12, 2016.


© Copyright 2018 Discovery Health Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Posted in Diet

Even “Trusted Sources” May Put Your Health at Risk

The lie reared its ugly head again. As the U.S. celebrated National Tequila Day, “news” outlets fell all over themselves to remind us that drinking tequila may be a great way to lose weight.

Seriously. Britain’s Independent ran with the headline, “TEQUILA IS LINKED TO WEIGHT LOSS, STUDY CLAIMS.”

According to the article, “…a study has found a link between tequila and weight loss.” And, “According to research… everyone’s favorite party spirit, which is being celebrated today in the US for National Tequila Day, can help lower your blood sugar too.”

The only problem? It’s complete B.S.

Millions rely on the Web for health information. Here’s why that’s often a bad – even potentially fatal – idea.

Numbers Have Become More Important Than Truth

Newscaster Walter Cronkite was once the most trusted man in America. When he closed his nightly newscast with “And that’s the way it is,” millions of Americans knew it was true.

In those days, networks took news coverage seriously. The nightly news – both national and local – wasn’t expected to turn a profit. It was expected to inform. It was the cost for filling the rest of their airtime with programming aimed at making a buck.

At some point, this view began to change. The network with the most news viewers started prime time with an advantage. Getting up to change the channel was a hassle. So the biggest news audience could boost prime time ratings. And profits.

Human interest stories began to crowd out actual news stories. Journalists were replaced at the anchor desk with pretty faces. And sensationalism took the place of accuracy in headlines.

Which brings us to the tequila story.

We Got You to Read It… Who Cares If It’s Not True?

Apparently, not some major media outlets. Here are the headlines they ran on the same study The Independent covered…

Time Magazine – “Study: Sugars Found In Tequila Could Help You Lose Weight”
Cosmopolitan – “It turns out tequila is GOOD FOR YOU”
Britain’s Daily Express – “Weight loss: How THIS alcoholic drink could help you lose weight”

All of these stories – and dozens of others I checked – claim drinking tequila may help you lose weight. All cited the same 2014 study.

It wasn’t till I reached page 3 of the 8.6 million results for “tequila weight loss” that I found a dissenting voice.

That’s disturbing. Because drinking tequila won’t help you lose weight. And the study all these stories cite tells you exactly that.

The study found agavins – a carbohydrate in agave plants – helped keep blood sugar levels lower in mice. They also boosted insulin levels in these mice.

That may be good news for diabetics. But not for tequila drinkers. Why?

 “All ethanol in tequila comes from the fermentation of glucose and fructose generated after agave pines are cooked,” says a press release from the publisher. “But because the agavins are converted to ethanol, agavins are not found in the finished product.”

This is the source material for most of these articles. But hundreds of media outlets went for the sensational headline… and skipped the truth.

An isolated incident? I don’t think so. The Independent also published this headline: “DRINKING TEQUILA IS GOOD FOR YOUR BONES, SCIENCE SAYS.”

Which is also complete B.S. But that didn’t stop other media outlets – such as The N.Y. Post and L.A. Times from publishing the same misleading crap.

There’s only one way to protect yourself from this kind of bad reporting.

Get the Real Story From the Source

You’ll often get a different story reading the source material health reporters use. Sometimes an article includes a link to the source. If it doesn’t, you may have to dig a little.

If an article’s source is a university study, the college has probably issued a press release. Just search online for the topic and the university name. Or go to the university’s website and search there.

Organizations often publish research presented at conferences. They also issue press releases. A search for the organization and the topic will often turn up the source material.

If all else fails, PubMed (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) or Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.com) can often find the source material for you.

You can’t always trust media reports. As we’ve seen here, the drive for viewers can trump facts. And when it comes to your health, you need facts.

About the Author: Jason Kennedy is a celebrated investigative health writer and the author of The X-Factor Revolution and Beyond the Blue Zone. With over 10 years of experience working with today’s leading alternative and anti-aging doctors, Jason shares his insider status and access to the latest breakthroughs with thousands of readers from around world.


Hosie, R., “Tequila Is Linked to Weight Loss, Study Claims,” The Independent. Jul 26, 2018.

Sifferlin, A., “Study: Sugars Found In Tequila Could Help You Lose Weight,” Tiime. Mar 18, 2014.

Harvey-Jenner, C., “It turns out tequila is good for you,” Cosmopolitan. Jun 1, 2017.

“Weight loss: How this alcoholic drink could help you lose weight,” Express.co.uk.

“Tequila plant is possible sweetener for diabetics — helps reduce blood sugar, weight,” American Chemical Society. Mar 16, 2014.

Young, S., “Drinking Tequila Is Good For Your Bones, Science Says,” The Independent. Jul 24, 2018.

Downey, A., “Drinking tequila could boost bone health,” N.Y. Post. May 8, 2017.

Fantozzi, J., “Drinking Tequila Is Good for Your Bones,” The Daily Mail. May 10, 2017.

“In search of a treatment for osteoporosis from the tequila agave,” ScienceDaily.com. Apr 9, 2016.


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